Licensing and Regulation of Child Care Centers in Ohio

In Ohio, some types of child care must be regulated or licensed. Some types of care require no license. Ohio providers may be licensed by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services or the Ohio Department of Education.

Ohio Department of Job and Family Services licenses the following types of settings:

Centers – Seven or more children of any age are cared for in a setting outside of a personal residence. Centers must be licensed. The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services licenses over 3500 child care centers which care for over 215,000 children each day.

Type A Homes – Seven to twelve children (or four to twelve children if four children are under two years of age) are cared for in the provider’s personal residence. The provider’s own children under six years of age must be included in the total count. Type A homes must be licensed. 60 Type A Homes are licensed by the Department of Job and Family Services.

Type B Homes – One to six children are cared for in the provider’s personal residence. No more than three children may be under two years of age. The provider’s own children under six years of age must be included in the total count. Anyone can operate a Type B Home without a license. However, care for more than 6 children requires a license. Type B Homes must be certified by the county department of Job and Family Services if the child care is paid for with public funds. Approximately 7,000 Type B Homes are certified by local departments of Job and Family Services.

Schoolage centers – Seven or more children aged kindergarten and above are cared for in a setting outside of a personal residence. Schoolage centers must be licensed. 435 Schoolage centers are licensed by the Department of Job and Family Services.

Child day camps – A program which operates for less than seven hours a day and only during the vacation of the public schools, caring only for schoolage children, and which is at least 50% outdoor based. Child day camps must register with the department each year. If child care is paid for with public funds, the camp must also meet American Camping Association Accreditation standards, or be approved by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services. Approximately 250 child day camps register with the department each year.

SOURCE: ODJFS Website

Ohio Department of Education also licenses Preschool Programs and School Age Child Care (SACC)

The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) is responsible for licensing preschool programs (birth-age 5 not in Kindergarten) operated by:
• Public schools,
• Educational Service Centers,
• Boards of Developmental Disabilities, and
• Chartered nonpublic schools with multiple grades above kindergarten

Preschool Licensing Rules

and school-age child care (5yrs- 14yrs) programs operated by:
• Public schools,
• Educational Service Centers,
• Community schools,
• Boards of Developmental Disabilities, and
• Chartered nonpublic schools with multiple grades above kindergarten

SACC Licensing Rules

SOURCE: ODE Website


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